Dogen Sangha Blog

  by Gudo NISHIJIMA

Japanese / German

Monday, June 5, 2006

Zazen (4) Daily Life and Zazen

EVERYDAY PRACTICE

It is meaningless if we do not practice Zazen everyday. Though we can get the balanced state of the autonomic nervous system on a certain day when we have practiced Zazen, if it is impossible to practice Zazen on another day, we sink into a situation in which we cannot keep the balance of the autonomic nervous system on that day. If we have to practice Zazen in such an irregular manner, we will have some days when our autonomic nervous system is balanced, and other days when it is impossible for us to keep our autonomic nervous system balanced. In such a case it is inevitable that we will have a balanced autonomic nervous system one day, but impossible to maintain it the next. In such an unstable condition we will experience a very unpleasant condition in which some days we are very comfortable, and some days we are very uncomfortable. Therefore if we want to be balanced and happy everyday, it is necessary for us to practice Zazen each day without fail.

NECESSITY OF PRACTICING ZAZEN AT LEAST 2 TIMES EACH DAY

Because the practice of Zazen should be done for keeping the balanced state of the autonomic nervous system every day, the more frequently we practice Zazen, the better we can keep constant the balanced state of the autonomic nervous system. Master Dogen recommended us to practice Zazen 4 times a day in his book entitled "Bendo-Ho," or "the method of pursuing the Truth," which belongs to "Eihei Shigi," or the "Pure Rules of Eihei Temple." The Zazen practice periods in Eiheiji Temple are Zazen in the early morning, which is called the Zazen of "Doya," or "the early morning", and Zazen after breakfast, which is called the Zazen of "Soshin," or "in the morning," and Zazen after lunch, which is called "Hoji," or "after lunch," and the Zazen in the evening, which is called the Zazen of "Okon," or "the evening." Therefore it can be said that we should also follow the criteria, that is, we should follow "Bendo Ho," which Master Dogen has established.

But when we think about the real situations, there is a very important fact to consider, that is, the difference between the 13th Century, when Master Dogen lived, and the 21st Century, when we are now living. In the 13th Century many countries were feudalistic societies that were supported by agricultural production. But in the 21st Century many countries are democratic and capitalistic societies. Therefore, in the age when Master Dogen lived, people could maintain their economical life relying upon cultivating fields. But nowadays we are living in democratic and capitalistic societies, and so we have to get some kind of monetary income in our daily life in order to maintain our economical needs. For managing such a situation it is usually necessary for us to work at some kind of job almost everyday. Therefore, even if we want to practice Zazen four times a day, it is almost impossible for us to do so. And so it is unavoidable for us to be satisfied by practicing Zazen only 2 times each day generally. Of course periodically we can have a chance to have a Sesshin, or a short term of concentrated practice. So even though we may need twice the number of years to get the second enlightenment like that of many excellent ancient Chinese Buddhist Masters, if we practice Zazen everyday, we can get the first enlightenment everyday. I think that the first enlightenment is just the practice of zazen itself at the present moment. The second enlightenment is just the perfect understanding of the Buddhist philosophical system based on the Buddhist practitioner's sincere daily life on the basis of practicing zazen. If we continue the practice of Zazen everyday, we can enter into the state of enlightenment constantly, and we can enjoy our everyday life.

How long should one sitting of Zazen be? We can decide, for example, 15 minutes, 30 minutes, 45 miutes, and so forth. But generally speaking, it might be better for us first to decide an adequate length for beginners, and better for us increase the time following our progress.

PLACE OF PRACTICE

As for the place where we practice Zazen, Fukan-Zazen-Gi expressed that "a quiet place is better," and so it is preferable for us to select a quiet place. But it is not necessary for us to be too sensitive to that problem. It is not necessary for us to find a profound place, for example, the deepest place in a mountain. Common, ordinary places are sufficient for us to practice Zazen.

And as for the width of the sitting place, it is written in Fukan-Zazen-Gi that "we should guard and maintain a place where it is possible for the place to be wide enough to maintain ourself." So it is sufficient for us to make a place where we can sit easily.

CLOTHES

As for the clothes, it is not necessary for us to attach any problem to them. But as for the Kashaya, which has been used since the Gautama Buddha's time, it is desirable for us to attach significance to it because it has been traditional since ancient India and symbolically relates us to Gautama Buddha. Actually, when we use a Kashaya by ourselves, the feeling is much more dignified and holy, and so we can strongly enjoy a rather happy feeling. I think that there is no problem for anyone to wear a Kashaya. So it is permissible for anyone, even a person who has not yet experienced a precepts receiving ceremony, to utilize the Kashaya without hesitation. When we order it from a Kashaya shop, much to our surprise we might find it to be very expensive. So it is better for us to select one made of some artificial material such as nylon rather than the traditional, and very expensive, silk. Kashayas sewn by machine are also acceptable. I do not hold to any idea that a Kashaya must be sewn by hand. A Japanese publication house called "Daihorin-Kaku" has published a Japanese book called "Kesa no Kenkyu," or "Research of Kashaya," which includes the precise method of sewing a Kashaya. If it were translated into English, this book might be very convenient for people abroad to learn how to sew Kashayas by themselves. In Dogen Sangha there are several people who are skillful at sewing Kashayas by hand, and they have a monthly meeting to make their Kashayas by themselves. I think that they have not yet begun to sew Kashayas with machines.

29 Comments:

Blogger Pierre Turlur said...

Dear Nishijima Roshi,

Thank you for reminding everybody that wearing the kasaya has nothing to do with being priest or not, it is just the robe of Zazen.

In my limited opinion and after twenty five years of sewing kasaya I would say that sewing by hand is best following the method and principles of Sawaki Kodo.

If people want to get some information about sewing in English, they may have a look at my blog:
http://nyohoekesa.blogspot.com/

It is far from perfect but it could provide a start.

Deep Bows

Pierre

4:21 PM, June 05, 2006  
Blogger 123Twist said...

Mr. Cross,

若王食已欲飮漿時索仙陀婆、便奉器。若王欲遊索仙陀婆、便奉馬

When your teacher ask for salt, you throw in wound. You pour water on old head, hit him with pot and such. That is you Saindhava.

You are not wise retainer, and like you do with Shobogenzo every time, you twist meaning to suit Mr. Cross.

It is evil Buddhism that twists teachings and manipulate peoples.

Peace, H

7:17 PM, June 05, 2006  
Blogger Jules said...

Nishijima san,
I hope you will clarify a point for me.

By "first enlightenment," do you mean finding balance in zazen?

By "second enlightenment," do you mean staying balanced 100% of the time?

6:18 AM, June 06, 2006  
Blogger Lone Wolf said...

Thank you Nishijima. I will do my best to sit Zazen at least twice a day. Like Jules, I am also interested in the meaning of "first enlightment" and "second enlightment".

12:26 PM, June 06, 2006  
Blogger GUDO NISHIJIMA said...

For pierre turiur San

I agree with your idea that Kashaya is just the robe of Zazen.

Of course Master Kodo Sawaki taught us to sew Kashaya with hands, because at that time it was the main method for us to sew clothes. Therefore I interpret that Master Sawaki's instruction does not restrict sewing Kashaya with machine. I hope that many people can wear Kashaya, when they practice Zazen.

Even I haven't read your blog yet, I would like to say my thanks.


For 123twist San

I am afraid that your criticism has hit the target.


For Jules San

I think that the first enlightenment is just the practice of Zazen at the present moment.

And the second enlightenment is just the perfect understanding Buddhist philosophical system based on the Buddhist practioner's sincere daily life on the basis of practicing Zazen.


For Lone Wolf San

As I wrote above,

I think that the first enlightenment is just the practice of Zazen at the present moment.

And the second enlightenment is just the perfect understanding Buddhist philosophical system based on the Buddhist practioner's sincere daily life on the basis of practicing Zazen.

3:17 PM, June 06, 2006  
Blogger Mike Cross said...

For many years I felt something wrong in Gudo Nishijima’s emphasis on the autonomic nervous system. And for many years the Master felt something wrong in my affirmation, based on Alexander practice and experience, of mental effort in Zazen, or intention.

But those problems have been perfectly solved already, relying on clear understanding at last of Master Dogen’s three sentences:

(1) We should sit in the full lotus posture with body.

(2) We should sit in the full lotus posture with mind.

(3) We should sit in the full lotus posture as the dropping off of body and mind.

To 123twist:

In working towards this solution, yes, I made many mistakes, big and small. So yes, congratulations, your criticism hit the target.

The King asked for water and stupid me served salt, again and again and again.

But those mistakes are in the past, I confessed them already, and this morning the birds are vigorously preaching a Buddhist lecture.

If you wish to continue discussing my past mistakes, that is up to you. But in that case I wonder why you preach adherence to the Buddhist precepts?

4:00 PM, June 06, 2006  
Blogger 123Twist said...

Mr. Mike Cross,

Yes, all make mistake, past is in past and life always start new. And, I am not judge of the man's current intention. No person is (maybe Sensei can be). Really, only you can be.

But you do so much damage to people for many year, now quickly change when it seem suit your need. Angry leopard is backed in corner of people saying "goodbye," so now trapped leopard is smiling like a friend. Oh oh, be carefule of leopards!

I say that if you do bad thing for much time, all Karma is gone instantly in a moment of Zazen and true self-reflection.

Still, you need prove self change to people for many year and much time as you did harm. Even though I have not a right to be your judge, I think that is only common sense, no?

You cannot come back now and say "sorry," when last week you still act angry and vicious to Sensei and many people. Please do not act crazy attacker for some long time, then after that "change spots."

Peace, H

5:37 PM, June 06, 2006  
Blogger Mike Cross said...

Dear 123twist,

Thank you very much for your stimulating accusations.

What does it mean to sit in the full lotus posture with the mind?

I think it means, for example, not to be distracted, not to pay too much attention to other matters which, compared with sitting in the full lotus posture are not so important or valuable. It means, when one becomes aware of some unconscious impulse arising, to decide not to react to it. Not react means don’t give it energy either by suppressing it or by dwelling on it.

This practice is more or less impossible, but I think it is made a little bit more possible by Master Dogen’s enormous benevolence to write the chapter Zanmai-o-zanmai. Reading that chapter, we can know clearly what Master Dogen thought was supremely important, and therefore what he thought was not so important.

If you don’t mind, I would like to stop my replies to your comments now. I will let you have the last word.

Denis Legrand recommended me several months ago not to get drawn into long email discussions with anonymous people. But because I am stupid, as you know so well, it takes me a long time to really understand the truth of this, or any principle.

Good luck to you on your Buddhist journey, whoever you are, and goodbye.

2:02 AM, June 07, 2006  
Blogger Mike Cross said...

About the kashaya, the first kashaya I received, which was given to me by Michael and Yoko Luetchford, was machine sewn. To me, it was undoubtedly a true kashaya.

Michael Luetchford, whether or not he is recognized as a member or branch of Dogen Sangha, is in fact a root of Dogen Sangha, which should not be cut. Silence can manifest many kinds of state, but I think that silence of Dogen Sangha members on this matter might suggest the lack of the second enlightenment so far, in each of them.

Also in connection with the kashaya, there is a contributor (blog name Bubba), to the nyo-ho-e kashaya blog of Pierre Turlur. Regarding the meaning of MU-I (“without intention”, as discussed in the previous post), Bubba suggested to me that the 2nd law of thermodynamics, which has to do with spontaneous dissipation of energy, might be relevant.

I think that, if we want to connect Master Dogen’s supreme teaching to modern scientific knowledge, which we clearly do, then, for “Sit in the full lotus posture with the body” the autonomic nervous system is very relevant; but, for “Sit in the full lotus posture as the dropping off body and mind,” the second law of thermodynamics might be most relevant. So once again, Bubba, thank you for your pointer.

5:44 PM, June 07, 2006  
Blogger Mike Cross said...

Master Dogen taught:

(1) We should physically sit in the full lotus posture.
(2) We should mentally sit in the full lotus posture.
(3) We should sit in the lotus posture as the dropping off of body and mind.

(1) Physical sitting in the lotus posture, I can do, by muscular effort. Thus I have been doing it, every day for more than 20 years, usually four times a day.

(2) Mental sitting in the lotus posture I cannot do by muscular effort, but I can practice it, mainly by deciding NOT to do. Not doing, but instead practicing the backward step of turning attention inward, as if in silent prayer. Not trying to gain any end, but coming back to trust in a process, like polishing a tile.

(3) But dropping off body and mind is a spontaneous happening; it is beyond me. I cannot do it and cannot practice it. It happens spontaneously, naturally. Or it does not happen at all. It is not a physiological state in me, like balance of the autonomic nervous sysem, but is a real, spontaneous happening, like the warble of a songbird.

Therefore, I sit in lotus, waiting, with body and with mind, like this.

Gudo Nishijima. For 25 years I have witnessed your great pride in your realistic Buddhist viewpoint, as expressed in your many books. I have suffered from your egotistical desire to be recognized as the main translator of Shobogenzo, the discoverer of the importance of the autonomic nervous system in Zazen, et cetera, et cetera. I have also witnessed your enormous will to the truth, manifested in your sincere effort to answer to the best of your ability the many thousands of questions on Buddhism that I have asked you over the years.

Your interpretation of Master Dogen’s 3 sentences above, each on the basis of your idea about the autonomic nervous system, was a mistake. Now I have pointed out to you your mistake very clearly and exactly. So I am waiting impatiently to see how you respond: will you recognize your mistake as a mistake, like a true person, or not.

In the end there is only one question:

Gudo Nishijima. Have you met the tathagata yet, or not?

6:15 PM, June 08, 2006  
Blogger 123Twist said...

Mr. Cross,

Have you met the tathagata yet, or not?

If somebody who meets Tathagata must then act like you, then I do not wish to meet that Tathagata. Fortunately, I think you met Tathagata only in fantasy, because person who meets Tathagata will not act unbalanced like you.

I have suffered from your egotistical desire

Sorry you suffer. Try real Zazen for suffer, the real Zazen that make you less angry and suffer and jealous. Mr. Cross just sits with cross legs, not Zazen, if he so cross.

You can talk all day and night about understanding Shobogenzo, and meaning of Zazen, etc. But, if you act unbalanced as you seem, what can you possibly understand? It is like obese, cigarette smoking doctor telling patient to be healthy!

So, please try -real- sitting today.

Master Nishijima way is right way. How do we know? He is never unbalanced, always stable in mind and body, no matter how hard you kick and punch and taunt him. He just smile and move on. Thus, we know his way is better way of Zazen, because of how he does. That is the way he answers your challenge, I think.

Peace, H

1:09 PM, June 09, 2006  
Blogger MikeDoe said...

mike:
Why do you wish so much to rejoin the Dogen Sangha and in particular to become a student again of Gudo Nishijima?

One moment you venerate him, the next you taunt him, always in a very public way.

Even with my limited understanding of japanese protocols I would understand this to be a highly unusual way to approach such a thing.

You have known him for so long that I do wonder what he has left that he can teach you.

I am almost tempted to agree with 123Twist (Is he your twin?)

I can only comment from what I have seen on the blogs from the last year, but if what you write on the blogs is based on your personal experience in Zazen rather than just some ideas you have then I would suggest to you that you have made more progress in Zazen without Gudo Nishijima as a teacher than you ever did with him.

Maybe, like 123Twist says (whoever he is). It is time for you to stop putting off the hard work. To start taking Zazen more seriously and to start meeting Mike Cross first hand. To start meeting your own pain and anger, embracing it and letting go. All of this will arise in Zazen when you stop preventing it.

As for you 123Twist. Your words seem to be phrased in a way that taunts and increases suffering rather than in a way that shows compassion and empathy. This might be due to great skill on your part or it might be due to Ego.

Earlier this week I was flicking through Book 4 of the SBZ and read the chapter on the 4 types of horses. It is important to know which type of horse you have before you use whips and spurs.

3:20 PM, June 09, 2006  
Blogger Mike Cross said...

Master Dogen taught us to sit in the full lotus posture with the body. My Master, Gudo Nishijima, taught me just this. Therefore I revere him so much.

Master Dogen taught us to sit in the full lotus posture with the mind. My Master, Gudo Nishijima, has not yet understood this teaching clearly (at least not theoretically, but I think maybe intuitively). Therefore he does not teach it to others. Therefore I criticize him so strongly.

In response to my criticism, he stopped our translation partnership and excluded me from Dogen Sangha. He did not show overt anger or imbalance, but his response was very cruel -- like a military general making a calculated decision to drop a bomb.

My Master tried to turn me into his enemy. But in that case, he loses. Why? If you wish to know the answer, read Shobogenzo chap. 72, Zanmai-o-zanmai.

4:20 PM, June 09, 2006  
Blogger 123Twist said...

Dear Mike Doe,

Yes, thank you for comment. You are right that I should not be angry.

We all try many thing with this horse for many years. Many years. We try sugar, we try silence, we try positive, we try warm words. He just go on, with cruelty to teacher and strange Napoleon fantasy (you say that?) and obsession due to a disturbed mental state.

I am student of martial arts, and then at one point you must direct attacker away, maybe with little more than passive gesture. I try to do it with Compassion, to say he will best find peace and put down anger. Yes, I get anger too at this rise up, which I drop in Zazen most time. Oh well, I am human being, not machine! Now, I feel this horse need more than sugar to have realization of Karma he create and to look in mirror.

Teacher does not care, keeps smiling, keep teaching just his teaching without care of silly disturbance like this. That is why teacher is teacher.

I think that I will do what Teacher Nishijima does. let the rain rain and the wind blow. Let Mr. Cross blow like wind! Sensei will do so forever. (I will do so until he starts with abuse comment, racist and that thing again).

Peace, H

6:23 PM, June 09, 2006  
Blogger Friend said...

This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.

9:58 PM, June 09, 2006  
Blogger GUDO NISHIJIMA said...

For Jules San And Lone Wolf San

Among your comments especially Jule San and Lone Wolf San wanted to know the real contents of the second enlightenment, therefore I would like to show you the real situations of the second enlightenment exactly following the Four Philosophies.

(1) In Idealistic View : The perfect understanding of Buddhist philosophy in both intellectual area and practical area

(2) In Materialistic View : The perfect maintenance of the balanced autonomic nervous system. In other words the perfect impossibility to become emotional.

(3) In Actual View : Efforts to solve every problem by act.

(4) In Reality : Having no problem.

9:44 AM, June 12, 2006  
Blogger Lone Wolf said...

Thank you very much Gudo Nishijima Roshi for your explination of the "second enlightment" based on the Four Philosophies. Could you please explain (3)How one makes efforts to solve every problem by act? and (4) How in reality one can have no problem?

12:25 PM, June 12, 2006  
Blogger Pierre Turlur said...

Dear Lone wolf,

I am certainly no roshi, nothing. Foolish monk, emotional wreck, deluded head. May be I could bring a bit of light here: our problem number one is to want not to have any problem. That simple. Clouds are great. They arise from the boundless blue and return to it.
Do you want to get rid of this scenery? What for,who for?

Why can't we just live things simply, cry when we cry, laugh when we laugh,why do we have to feel guilty, to push, try, scold, swear, sweat? What do we want to prove? that we are right? Or super right because we know we are wrong...

What a game!!!

Clouds...


Love

Kuma San

4:13 PM, June 12, 2006  
Blogger Mike Cross said...

I have already pointed out Gudo’s error to interpret “dropping off body and mind” as a state. As I wrote already, the words do not express a state: they express a real, spontaneous happening.

I would like to clarify further what dropping off body and mind means, on the basis of the four phases of Master Dogen’s thought, which I found in Shobogenzo:

(1) A clear “a ha!” realizing of the true, fundamental meaning of the Middle Way.

(2) Losing oneself in Nature.

(3) Enjoying doing well (with economy of effort) some task, sport, activity, or practice.

(4) Just sitting in the full lotus posture.

I do not doubt at all Gudo’s acheivement of (2), (3), and (4), but I wonder if (1) has become decisive yet or not.

4:43 PM, June 12, 2006  
Blogger Mike Ross said...

Thank you, Nishijima Roshi, for your explanation of Second Enlightenment. There must be a thousand teachers out there who teach their students to strive for "ah-ha!" moments like Mike Cross has described. But teachers like Nishijima Roshi who deny them are rare and precious people.

5:57 PM, June 12, 2006  
Blogger Mike Cross said...

It is necessary to discriminate between:

(1) "Second Enlightenment" as a concept which some so-called "Rinzai Zen" practitioners strive to realize, by thinking about Koans, et cetera, and which so-called "Soto Zen" practitioners, for example, Brad Warner (and "Mike Ross"?), so strongly deny; and,

(2) Second Enlightenment as a real, spontaneous happening, which is symbolized in Shobogenzo by Gautama seeing Venus, Chikan hearing a stone ping against a bamboo, and Rei-un seeing the peach blossoms in bloom.

In my case, Second Enlightenment was like this:

"Ah ha! Yes, now I really, truly understand what Master Dogen meant by sit in the full lotus posture with body, mind and as the dropping off of body and mind."

But the situation should not be described as "no problem." Because the very serious and difficult problem that immediately emerges is how to teach what I understood to others.

It is the solution of a theoretical problem; but it is the emergence in practice of extremely high fences and walls, and extremely troublesomee tiles and pebbles.

Guessing the game of a sly old fox, at last, I think that it might be his deepest wish to be defeated by one of his own students -- for example, Taijun, or Gabriele, or Michael Luetchford, or Mike Cross.

The old man might be thinking that if one of his students can defeat him in a discussion of Buddhist philosophy, then he can die a happy man.

In that case, in my speaking up and proclaiming that I have clearly understood the limitations of the conception of balance of the autonomic nervous system, I wonder, in the end: who has defeated whom?

7:36 PM, June 12, 2006  
Blogger ryunin said...

This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.

7:41 PM, June 12, 2006  
Blogger Drunken Monkey said...

Thanks for that Ryunin, that was quite refreshing. The right way to go about zazen is to think of it as a hobby. A very important hobby nonetheless but one that doesn't linger in your thoughts when you step outside of zazen practice.

Thankyou, once again Nishijima Roshi for another insightful article. It was just two days ago when I realised that a day without zazen was quite horrible for me.
I was quite busy that day so I totally forgot about doing zazen, yet there was this lingering feeling in the back of my mind that reminded me that something was not right. The day was absolutely boring and I felt quite dead inside. The next day I resumed my zazen practice and now life feels real and pleasant again.
I feel its easier to observe my thoughts and dissociate myself from anger now that I practice zazen. So I am suprised that people who have been practicing zazen for 20 years or so still give in to anger and other negative dwellings of the mind.

8:13 PM, June 12, 2006  
Blogger Jules said...

Guessing the game of a sly old fox, at last, I think that it might be his deepest wish to be defeated by one of his own students -- for example, Taijun, or Gabriele, or Michael Luetchford, or Mike Cross.

The old man might be thinking that if one of his students can defeat him in a discussion of Buddhist philosophy, then he can die a happy man.


Mike,
What makes you think any game is being played at all?

11:58 PM, June 12, 2006  
Blogger Mike Cross said...

Jules,
There is a chapter of the Lotus Sutra called Hoben-bon, from the Sanskrit upaya-kausalya. Upaya means that by which one reaches one's aim. Kausalya means craftiness.

12:12 AM, June 13, 2006  
Blogger GUDO NISHIJIMA said...

For Pierre Turlur San

I noticed that you are very skillful to make Kashaya.

It is true that kashaya is not only for Buddhist monks, but laymen and laywomen should also wear Kashaya, when they practice Zazen.

It is true that Master Kodo Sawaki didn't think sewing Kashaya at all, because when Master Kodo Sawaki lived sewing machines are very rare in Japan, and so I guess that Master Kodo Sawaki has never thought to sew Kashaya with a sewing machine.


For 123Twist San

I agree with your idea. If a king want to drink water, a servant should serve a cup to the king, and if a king wants to go out for horse riding, a servant should serve a horse to the king.

I agree with your idea that Shobogenzo should never be twisted by personal preference at all.


For Jules San

I interpret that the first enlightenment is just to practice Zazen. Therefore it is just the sitting in the balanced autonomic nervous system.

I would like to explain the second enlightenment relying upon the Buddhist four philosophies.
1) In the intellectual viewpoint : The perfect understanding Buddhist philosophy on the basis of intellectual consideration.
2) In the physical condition : The perfectly balanced autonomic nervous system.
3) In the real act at the present moment : All problems should be solved by real act at the present moment.
4) In Reality : There is nothing to worry about, because everything is well as it is.


For Lone Wolf San

My answers to you are also the same as the answers to Jules San.

11:44 AM, June 20, 2006  
Blogger GUDO NISHIJIMA said...

For Pierre Turlur San

Even though I wrote my comments two times, but unfortunately they were erazed, and so I would like to write the almost same comments again. Master Kodo Sawaki didn't think to make Kashaya with sewing machine, because at that time sewing machines were very few in Japan.

11:56 AM, June 21, 2006  
Blogger GUDO NISHIJIMA said...

For 123Twist San

I agree with your ide, and it is very bad Buddhism to twist teachings and munipulate people.


For Jules San

It is the first enlightenment to practice Zazen.

The second enlightenment is adequate to be explained following the four Buddhist philosophies.

1) The perfect understanding Buddhism on the intellecual basis.

2) The perfect balance in the autonomic nervous system.

3) Solution is always done relying upon
act.

4) Reality is the truth as it is.


For Lone Wolf San

I would like to tell you the same comments as to Jules San.

1:59 PM, June 21, 2006  
Blogger Erik Mann said...

another great blog from you guys. i'd point you to mine but it isn't yet the way I'd like it. i do have a website that I think is cool, kind of almost about martial art shoes

5:36 PM, August 02, 2006  

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