Dogen Sangha Blog

  by Gudo NISHIJIMA

Japanese / German

Friday, April 16, 2010

Information

My computer has been repaired by Prof. Shin Kirik's efforts since a few days ago.

5 Comments:

Blogger Uku said...

Dear Nishijima Roshi,

great to have you back in the blog world. Looking forward to read your upcoming posts.

Thank you for your efforts.

Yours,
Markus

6:59 PM, April 18, 2010  
Blogger Harry said...

Dear Sensei,

I'm glad your computer problems are resolved.

I have a question for you about karma:

Some people seem to use the term 'karma' to mean a rule of general cause and effect.

On the other hand, as you know, it is said that Gautama Buddha seemed to teach that karma relates directly only to the area of human intention, action, and the effects of action in the actors consciousness, and not to areas of cause and effect beyond this. The Abhidharma texts attempt to explain other 'cause and effect' laws (such as natural laws outside of our personal control) in other seperate terms (the Niyamas).

It seems that, if we want to diectly understand Action, it may be important to clearly undersatnd what 'karma' really describes.

What do you see the term 'karma' as describing?

Thanks & Regards,

Harry.

6:28 AM, April 19, 2010  
Blogger GUDO NISHIJIMA said...

Dear Ven. Uku Markus San,

Thank you very much for your kind encagements to me.

I feel very happy to continue my Dogen Sangha Blog further.


Dear Ven. Harry San,

As you said, the true meaning of karma is just Action.

In Gautama Bhudda's Four Philosophies,
Consideration, Perception, Action, and Reality, are the four factors of Buddhist Philosophy, and among the four important Factors, the third one, that is Action, is the most important Factor of Buddhist Philosophy.

And the theory of cause and effect belong to the second philosophy of Materialism. Therefore it is necessary for us to separate cause and effect from Action itself.

The finding the philosophy of Action by Gautama Buddha in Buddhist Philosophy is the most importantly distinguished services of Gautama Buddha, and so we should never forget Gautama Buddha's enormous efforts at all.

4:35 PM, April 19, 2010  
Blogger David K. Lemming said...

Dear Nishijima Roshi,

I have a question, I am just starting to learn about Zen and Buddhism in general. I heard Brad Warner talk about it not being a good idea to practice without a teacher to guide you in some way. As there are not teacher in my rural area, is there any advice that you might offer for me in the beginning of my learning?

11:03 AM, April 24, 2010  
Blogger GUDO NISHIJIMA said...

Blogger David K. Lemming said...

Dear Nishijima Roshi,

I have a question, I am just starting to learn about Zen and Buddhism in general. I heard Brad Warner talk about it not being a good idea to practice without a teacher to guide you in some way. As there are not teacher in my rural area, is there any advice that you might offer for me in the beginning of my learning?

Gudo Nishijima's answers: If there were no teacher, who can speak to you adequate answers, it might be the best way for you to ask the questions to Dogen Sangha Blog directly, I think.

8:19 PM, September 12, 2010  

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